Kenya is a country in East Africa with coastline on the Indian Ocean. It encompasses savannah, Lakelands, the dramatic Great Rift Valley and mountain highlands. It’s also home to wildlife like lions, elephants and rhinos. From Nairobi, the capital, safaris visit the Maasai Mara Reserve, known for its annual wildebeest migrations, and Amboseli National Park, offering views of Tanzania’s 5,895m Mt. Kilimanjaro.

Kenya is a popular tourist destination, mostly because it enjoys a wonderful tropical climate. It is generally warm all year round, with plenty of sunshine, and cooler nights and mornings. Visitors are able to enjoy most activities on the beaches and on the national parks all year round. Since kenya lies on the equator, the seasonal temperature change is not extreme.

Below are the most visited tourists centers in kenya;

1. Maasai Mara National Reserve

Maasai Mara National Reserve is one of the world’s most magnificent game reserves. Bordering Tanzania, the Mara is the northern extension of the Serengeti and forms a wildlife corridor between the two countries. It is named after the statuesque, red-cloaked Maasai people who live in the park and graze their animals here as they have done for centuries. In their language, Mara means “mottled,” perhaps a reference to the play of light and shadow from the acacia trees and cloud-studded on the vast grasslands.

The park is famous for the Great Migration, when thousands of wildebeest, Zebra, and Thomson’s gazelle travel to and from the Serengeti, from July through October. In the Mara River, throngs of hippos and crocodiles lurk. The park is also known from providing excellent predator sightings, thanks to its relatively large populations of lions, cheetah, and leopard- especially in the dry months from December through February. Thanks to the park’s altitude, the weather here is mild and gentle year-round.

2. Tsavo National Park

Tsavo park is sliced into two: Tsavo West and Tsavo East. Together these parks comprise four percent of the country’s total area and encompass rivers, waterfalls, savannah, volcanic hills, a massive lava-rock plateau, and an impressive diversity of wildlife. Midway between Nairobi and Mombasa, Tsavo East is famous for photo-worthy sightings of large elephants herds rolling and bathing in red dust. The palm-fringed Galana River twists through the park providing excellent game viewing and a lush counterpoint to the arid plains. Other highlights here include the Yatta plateau, the world’s longest lava flow; and the Lugard Falls, which spill into rapids and crocodile-filled pools.

3. Amboseli National Reserve

Crowned by Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest peak, Amboseli National Reserve is one of Kenya’s most popular tourist parks. The name “Amboseli” comes from a Maasai word meaning “salty dust,” an apt description for the park’s parched conditions. The reserve is one of the best places in Africa to view large herds of elephants up close. Other wildlife commonly spotted in the park includes big cats, such as lion and cheetah, as well as giraffe, impala, eland, waterbuck, gazelle, and more than 600 species of birds. Nature lovers can explore five different habitats here, ranging from the dried up bed of Lake Amboseli, wetlands with sulfur springs, savannah, and woodlands. Look for the local Maasai people who live in the area around the park.

4. Samburu, Buffalo Springs, and Shaba National Reserves

On the banks of the palm-lined Ewaso Nyiro River, Samburu, Buffalo Springs, and Shaba Reserves lie in an arid region in the remote north of Kenya. Shaba National Reserves is one of the two areas where George and Joy Adamson raised Elsa the lioness, made famous in the film Born Free. The wildlife in all three reserves depends on the waters of the the river to survive, and many speciesare especially adapted to the parched conditions, such as Grevy’s zebras; Somali ostriches; and generuks, the long-necked antelope that stand on two rear legs to reach the fresh shoots on upper tree limbs.

A top attraction in Samburu National Reserve are the Sahara Singing Wells, local watering holes where Samburu warriors sing traditional songs while hauling water for their cattle to drink.

You might also be rewarded with sightings of big cats and wild dogs.

5. Lake Nakuru National Park

Lake Nakuru National Park, in central Kenya, is famous for its huge flocks of pink flamingoes. The birds throng on Lake Nakuru itself, one of the Rift Valley Soda Lakes that comprise almost a third of the park’s area. The park was established in 1961, and more than 450 species of birds have been recorded here, as well as rich diversity of other wildlife. Lions, leopards, warthogs, waterbucks, pythons, and white rhinos are just some of the animals you might see, and the landscapes range from sweeping grasslands bordering the lake to rocky cliffs and woodlands.

6. Lamu Island

The small island of Lamu, northeast of Mombasa, oozes old-world charm.

A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Lamu Old Town is Kenya’s oldest continually inhabited settlement with origins dating back to 12th century. Strolling the labyrinthine streets, you can see the island’s rich trading history reflected in the buildings. Architectural features from the Arab world, Europe, and India are evident yet with a discernable Swahili technique. Intricately carved wooden doors, coral stone building, hidden courtyards, verandas, and rooftop patios are common features. Visiting here is like stepping back in time.

Most of Lamu’ population is Muslim, and both men and women dress in traditional attire. Top attractions on the island include Lamu Museum, with displays on Swahili culture and th eregion’s

By Catherine Mungai

An Outgoing girl based in Nairobi, Kenya who loves life, writing and reading.

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